Man City, fresh off their Premier League title victory, takes a veiled jab at Liverpool.

0
13

Today, Liverpool’s main priority was bidding farewell to Jürgen Klopp. However, Man City seemed to have the Reds on their mind when they won the Premier League.

Just moments after Manchester City’s under-dog team won the league, Pep Guardiola’s team took a blatant jab at Liverpool. It became the first team to win four Premier League titles in a row after defeating West Ham to take first place ahead of Arsenal.

While Jürgen Klopp gracefully acknowledged Manchester City in his farewell speech to the Liverpool supporters, pausing the celebrations at Anfield to congratulate his former foe on winning the Premier League, the Etihad team shown its true colors in a less amicable manner.

The Manchester City social media team created a post on X (previously Twitter) just minutes after winning the championship. “This. Means. Four,” it said, along with emojis of trophies.

After leading Liverpool, Jürgen Klopp has already talked about taking over another Premier League team.

This was blatantly satirical, considering ‘This Means More’ is the tagline Liverpool used to commemorate their recent success under Klopp. Although there may be legitimate criticisms from within regarding the manner in which this has been utilized as a promotional weapon over time, Manchester City’s jab is undoubtedly the least expensive one.

It might also be interpreted as a reference to Trent Alexander-Arnold’s recent comments, which repeated the club motto and stated that victories with Liverpool have greater significance than they would elsewhere. It’s odd that a Scouser who rose through the ranks of the Academy would find this even controversial; it would be even more remarkable if he thought differently.

Yet it appears that Manchester City is offended by Liverpool’s entirely reasonable view that its own team is unique. It seized the opportunity to make a final jab at Klopp’s group.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here